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Normal patellofemoral kinematic patterns during daily activities in dogs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, November 2016
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Title
Normal patellofemoral kinematic patterns during daily activities in dogs
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12917-016-0889-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica J. Moore, Stanley E. Kim, Scott A. Banks, Antonio Pozzi, Jason D. Coggeshall, Stephen C. Jones

Abstract

Patellar abnormalities are a common cause of pain and lameness in dogs; however, in vivo the relative motion between the femur and patella in dogs is not well described. The objective of this study was to define normal in vivo sagittal plane patellofemoral kinematics in three axes of motion using non-invasive methods. We hypothesized patellofemoral alignment in the sagittal plane would tightly correlate with the femorotibial flexion angle. Six healthy dogs without orthopedic disease underwent computed tomography (CT) of their hind limbs to create 3-D models of the patella and femur. Normal stifle joint motion was captured via flat-panel imaging while each dog performed a series of routine activities, including sitting, walking, and trotting. The 3-D models of the patella and femur were digitally superimposed over the radiographic images with shape-matching software and the precise movement of the patella relative to the femur was calculated. As the femorotibial joint flexed, the patellofemoral joint also flexed and the patella moved caudally and distally within the femoral trochlea during each activity. Patellar flexion and distal translation during walk and sit were linearly coupled with the femorotibial flexion angle. Offset was evident while trotting, where patella poses were significantly different between early and late swing phase (p ≤ 0.003). Patellar flexion ranged from 51 to 6° while trotting. The largest flexion angle (92°) occurred during sit. The patella traversed the entire proximodistal length of the femoral trochlea during these daily activities. Using single-plane flat-panel imaging, we demonstrated normal in vivo patellofemoral kinematics is tightly coupled with femorotibial kinematics; however, trot kinematic patterns did not follow the path defined by walking and stand-to-sit motions. Our normal data can be used in future studies to help define patellofemoral joint kinematics in dogs with stifle abnormalities.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Postgraduate 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 15 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 24 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 12%
Psychology 1 2%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 17 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,555,293
of 8,900,478 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#559
of 1,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,511
of 306,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#14
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,900,478 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,375 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 306,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.