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Application of the multiphase optimization strategy to a pilot study: an empirical example targeting obesity among children of low-income mothers

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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156 Mendeley
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Title
Application of the multiphase optimization strategy to a pilot study: an empirical example targeting obesity among children of low-income mothers
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3850-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kari C. Kugler, Katherine N. Balantekin, Leann L. Birch, Jennifer S. Savage

Abstract

Emerging approaches to building more efficient and effective behavioral interventions are becoming more widely available. The current paper provides an empirical example of the use of the engineering-inspired multiphase optimization strategy (MOST) to build a remotely delivered responsive parenting intervention to prevent obesity among children of low-income mothers with and without depressive symptoms. Participants were 107 mothers with (n = 45) and without (n = 62) depressive symptoms who had a child aged 12 to 42 months participating in the Women, Infants and Children program. Participants were randomized to one of sixteen experimental conditions using a factorial design that included a combination of the following eight remotely delivered intervention components: responsive feeding curriculum (given to all participants), parenting curriculum, portion size guidance, obesogenic risk assessment, personalized feedback on mealtime routines, feeding curriculum counseling, goal setting, mobile messaging, and social support. This design enabled efficient identification of components with low feasibility and acceptability. Completion rates were high (85%) and did not statistically differ by depressive symptoms. However, mothers with depressive symptoms who received obesogenic risk assessment and personalized feedback on mealtime routines components had lower completion rates than mothers without depressive symptoms. All intervention components were feasible to implement except the social support component. Regardless of experimental condition, most participants reported that the program increased their awareness of what, when, and how to feed their children. MOST provided an efficient way to assess the feasibility of components prior to testing them with a fully powered experiment. This framework helped identify potentially challenging combinations of remotely delivered intervention components. Consideration of how these results can inform future studies focused on the optimization phase of MOST is discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 156 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 154 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 15%
Researcher 21 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 10%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 32 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 12%
Social Sciences 15 10%
Computer Science 7 4%
Other 27 17%
Unknown 34 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2016.
All research outputs
#8,399,048
of 15,918,909 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,463
of 10,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,151
of 390,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#481
of 841 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,942 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 390,547 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 841 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.