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An update on semantic dementia: genetics, imaging, and pathology

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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85 Dimensions

Readers on

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195 Mendeley
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Title
An update on semantic dementia: genetics, imaging, and pathology
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13195-016-0219-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ramon Landin-Romero, Rachel Tan, John R. Hodges, Fiona Kumfor

Abstract

Progressive and relatively circumscribed loss of semantic knowledge, referred to as semantic dementia (SD) which falls under the broader umbrella of frontotemporal dementia, was officially identified as a clinical syndrome less than 50 years ago. Here, we review recent neuroimaging, pathological, and genetic research in SD. From a neuroimaging perspective, SD is characterised by hallmark asymmetrical atrophy of the anterior temporal pole and anterior fusiform gyrus, which is usually left lateralised. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed widespread changes in connectivity, implicating the anterior temporal regions in semantic deficits in SD. Task-related fMRI have also demonstrated the relative preservation of frontal and parietal regions alongside preserved memory performance. In addition, recent longitudinal studies have demonstrated that, with disease progression, atrophy encroaches into the contralateral temporal pole and medial prefrontal cortices, which reflects emerging changes in behaviour and social cognition. Notably, unlike other frontotemporal dementia subtypes, recent research has demonstrated strong clinicopathological concordance in SD, with TDP43 type C as the most common pathological subtype. Moreover, an underlying genetic cause appears to be relatively rare in SD, with the majority of cases having a sporadic form of the disease. The relatively clear diagnosis, clinical course, and pathological homogeneity of SD make this syndrome a promising target for novel disease-modifying interventions. The development of neuroimaging markers of disease progression at the individual level is an important area of research for future studies to address, in order to assist with this endeavour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 195 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 194 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 13%
Student > Bachelor 22 11%
Student > Master 22 11%
Other 21 11%
Other 43 22%
Unknown 27 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 27%
Psychology 42 22%
Neuroscience 27 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 3%
Other 22 11%
Unknown 36 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2020.
All research outputs
#6,307,868
of 19,441,086 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#844
of 1,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,541
of 409,347 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#54
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,441,086 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,009 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,347 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.