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Incidence of back pain in adolescent athletes: a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Incidence of back pain in adolescent athletes: a prospective study
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13102-016-0064-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steffen Mueller, Juliane Mueller, Josefine Stoll, Olaf Prieske, Michael Cassel, Frank Mayer

Abstract

Recently, the incidence rate of back pain (BP) in adolescents has been reported at 21%. However, the development of BP in adolescent athletes is unclear. Hence, the purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of BP in young elite athletes in relation to gender and type of sport practiced. Subjective BP was assessed in 321 elite adolescent athletes (m/f 57%/43%; 13.2 ± 1.4 years; 163.4 ± 11.4 cm; 52.6 ± 12.6 kg; 5.0 ± 2.6 training yrs; 7.6 ± 5.3 training h/week). Initially, all athletes were free of pain. The main outcome criterion was the incidence of back pain [%] analyzed in terms of pain development from the first measurement day (M1) to the second measurement day (M2) after 2.0 ± 1.0 year. Participants were classified into athletes who developed back pain (BPD) and athletes who did not develop back pain (nBPD). BP (acute or within the last 7 days) was assessed with a 5-step face scale (face 1-2 = no pain; face 3-5 = pain). BPD included all athletes who reported faces 1 and 2 at M1 and faces 3 to 5 at M2. nBPD were all athletes who reported face 1 or 2 at both M1 and M2. Data was analyzed descriptively. Additionally, a Chi(2) test was used to analyze gender- and sport-specific differences (p = 0.05). Thirty-two athletes were categorized as BPD (10%). The gender difference was 5% (m/f: 12%/7%) but did not show statistical significance (p = 0.15). The incidence of BP ranged between 6 and 15% for the different sport categories. Game sports (15%) showed the highest, and explosive strength sports (6%) the lowest incidence. Anthropometrics or training characteristics did not significantly influence BPD (p = 0.14 gender to p = 0.90 sports; r(2) = 0.0825). BP incidence was lower in adolescent athletes compared to young non-athletes and even to the general adult population. Consequently, it can be concluded that high-performance sports do not lead to an additional increase in back pain incidence during early adolescence. Nevertheless, back pain prevention programs should be implemented into daily training routines for sport categories identified as showing high incidence rates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 98 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Student > Master 9 9%
Researcher 8 8%
Other 17 17%
Unknown 20 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 25%
Sports and Recreations 24 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 12%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Psychology 2 2%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 25 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2017.
All research outputs
#2,692,248
of 20,523,918 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#91
of 385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,399
of 415,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#9
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,523,918 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 415,746 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.