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Infant formula feeding practices in a prospective population based study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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27 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Infant formula feeding practices in a prospective population based study
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12887-016-0754-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hazel Ann Smith, Jonathan O’B Hourihane, Louise C Kenny, Mairead Kiely, Patricia Leahy-Warren, Deirdre M. Murray

Abstract

It is recommended that formula-fed infants are given standard whey-based infant formula throughout the first year of life, unless otherwise advised by healthcare professionals. To our knowledge it has not yet been explored if parents are using a whey-based infant formula throughout the first 12 months of life. Reasons for parental choice of formula are also unknown. Therefore, the objective of this paper was to describe parental administration of whey-based and non whey-based infant formula in the first year of life. Data collected as part of the Cork BASELINE Birth Cohort Study examined infant feeding practices at 2, 6 and 12 months of age. Descriptive analysis explored infant feeding practices and parental reasons for changing from a whey-based to a non whey-based infant formula. Multiple logistic regression investigated parental and infant characteristics associated with the use of whey-based infant formula. In total, 62.4%, 40.4% and 12.8% parent(s) at 2, 6 and 12 months, respectively, gave their infant whey-based infant formula. No parental or infant characteristic was found to consistently influence the use of whey-based infant formula. The most common reason reported by parent(s) for changing their infant's formula to a non whey-based formula was that they perceived their baby as being hungry. The majority of parent(s) commence their infants on whey-based formula, but most change to non whey-based formula before 12 months of age. Parental perception of infant satiety and not healthcare advice was the most common reason for changing from a whey-based to a non whey-based infant formula. Additional research is now required to investigate the effect of whey-based and non whey-based infant formula on infant growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 17%
Student > Master 7 11%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 21 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 23 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,943,723
of 22,908,162 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#249
of 3,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,592
of 419,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#9
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,908,162 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,018 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,639 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.