↓ Skip to main content

Dietary stimulation of the endogenous somatotropic axis in weaner and grower-finisher pigs using medium chain triglycerides and cysteamine hydrochloride

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Dietary stimulation of the endogenous somatotropic axis in weaner and grower-finisher pigs using medium chain triglycerides and cysteamine hydrochloride
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40104-016-0121-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

David W. Miller, Zoe Prosser, Edward Y. W. Chee, Christian F. Hansen, Frank R. Dunshea, Bruce P. Mullan, John R. Pluske

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted to examine the overall hypothesis that addition of medium chain triglycerides (MCT) and cysteamine hydrochloride (CSH) into the diets of young and growing pigs would stimulate the endogenous somatotropic axis to improve growth and performance. In Experiment 1, weaner pigs were given either a 5 d dietary supplement of 5 % MCT (n = 8) or a control diet (n = 8). MCT increased the plasma concentration of growth hormone (GH; P < 0.05) and the GH secretagogue, ghrelin (P < 0.05). Additionally, the MCT treatment reduced scouring (P < 0.05), maintained villous height in the small intestine (P < 0.05) and stabilised daily weight gain (P < 0.05), compared to the controls. Experiment 2 compared the effects of 4 levels (0, 1, 3 and 6 % v/v) of MCT supplementation in grower-finisher male pigs, of approximately 35 kg live weight (n = 15 per treatment). Blood samples taken after 7 wk of treatment showed that the MCT supplementation increased circulating ghrelin (P < 0.001), GH (P < 0.01) and insulin (P < 0.05) concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Daily weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio were not affected by the MCT diets. In Experiment 3, 64 female pigs of approximately 60 kg live weight were allocated to one of three dietary treatments: control (n = 20); 6 % MCT (n = 21); and 70 mg/kg CSH (n = 21). After 3 wk of supplementation, the MCT treated pigs had a higher plasma concentration of ghrelin compared to the control and CSH pigs (P < 0.05). Plasma concentrations of GH and weight were not affected by any of the dietary treatments. Evidence is provided in Experiment 1 to support the use of dietary MCT supplements, perhaps acting via stimulation of somatotropic endocrine pathways, to minimise weaning-associated disorders such as slowing of growth and diarrhoea. In Experiments 2 and 3, although there was no effect on weight gain or feed conversion ratio in either experiment, MCT and CSH increased endocrine components of the somatotropic axis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Librarian 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 9 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 48%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,998,617
of 12,755,705 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#137
of 279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,145
of 371,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#12
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,755,705 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 279 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,472 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.