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Small proteins in cyanobacteria provide a paradigm for the functional analysis of the bacterial micro-proteome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

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1 tweeter
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Small proteins in cyanobacteria provide a paradigm for the functional analysis of the bacterial micro-proteome
Published in
BMC Microbiology, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0896-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Desiree Baumgartner, Matthias Kopf, Stephan Klähn, Claudia Steglich, Wolfgang R. Hess

Abstract

Despite their versatile functions in multimeric protein complexes, in the modification of enzymatic activities, intercellular communication or regulatory processes, proteins shorter than 80 amino acids (μ-proteins) are a systematically underestimated class of gene products in bacteria. Photosynthetic cyanobacteria provide a paradigm for small protein functions due to extensive work on the photosynthetic apparatus that led to the functional characterization of 19 small proteins of less than 50 amino acids. In analogy, previously unstudied small ORFs with similar degrees of conservation might encode small proteins of high relevance also in other functional contexts. Here we used comparative transcriptomic information available for two model cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714 for the prediction of small ORFs. We found 293 transcriptional units containing candidate small ORFs ≤80 codons in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, also including the known mRNAs encoding small proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus. From these transcriptional units, 146 are shared between the two strains, 42 are shared with the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana and 25 with E. coli. To verify the existence of the respective μ-proteins in vivo, we selected five genes as examples to which a FLAG tag sequence was added and re-introduced them into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. These were the previously annotated gene ssr1169, two newly defined genes norf1 and norf4, as well as nsiR6 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 6) and hliR1(high light-inducible RNA 1) , which originally were considered non-coding. Upon activation of expression via the Cu(2+.)responsive petE promoter or from the native promoters, all five proteins were detected in Western blot experiments. The distribution and conservation of these five genes as well as their regulation of expression and the physico-chemical properties of the encoded proteins underline the likely great bandwidth of small protein functions in bacteria and makes them attractive candidates for functional studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 26%
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 13 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 18%
Engineering 3 6%
Chemical Engineering 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 14 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2021.
All research outputs
#12,572,103
of 21,301,416 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,204
of 3,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,796
of 421,724 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#96
of 265 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,301,416 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,043 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,724 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 265 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.