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Pelvic and breast examination skills curricula in United States medical schools: a survey of obstetrics and gynecology clerkship directors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Pelvic and breast examination skills curricula in United States medical schools: a survey of obstetrics and gynecology clerkship directors
Published in
BMC Medical Education, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0835-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lorraine Dugoff, Archana Pradhan, Petra Casey, John L. Dalrymple, Jodi F. Abbott, Samantha D. Buery-Joyner, Alice Chuang, Amie J. Cullimore, David A. Forstein, Brittany S. Hampton, Joseph M. Kaczmarczyk, Nadine T. Katz, Francis S. Nuthalapaty, Sarah M. Page-Ramsey, Abigail Wolf, Nancy A. Hueppchen

Abstract

Learning to perform pelvic and breast examinations produces anxiety for many medical students. Clerkship directors have long sought strategies to help students become comfortable with the sensitive nature of these examinations. Incorporating standardized patients, simulation and gynecologic teaching associates (GTAs) are approaches gaining widespread use. However, there is a paucity of literature guiding optimal approach and timing. Our primary objective was to survey obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clerkship directors regarding timing and methods for teaching and assessment of pelvic and breast examination skills in United States medical school curricula, and to assess clerkship director satisfaction with current educational strategies at their institutions. Ob/Gyn clerkship directors from all 135 Liaison Committee on Medical Education accredited allopathic United States medical schools were invited to complete an anonymous 15-item web-based questionnaire. The response rate was 70%. Pelvic and breast examinations are most commonly taught during the second and third years of medical school. Pelvic examinations are primarily taught during the Ob/Gyn and Family Medicine (FM) clerkships, while breast examinations are taught during the Ob/Gyn, Surgery and FM clerkships. GTAs teach pelvic and breast examinations at 72 and 65% of schools, respectively. Over 60% of schools use some type of simulation to teach examination skills. Direct observation by Ob/Gyn faculty is used to evaluate pelvic exam skills at 87% of schools and breast exam skills at 80% of schools. Only 40% of Ob/Gyn clerkship directors rated pelvic examination training as excellent, while 18% rated breast examination training as excellent. Pelvic and breast examinations are most commonly taught during the Ob/Gyn clerkship using GTAs, simulation trainers and clinical patients, and are assessed by direct faculty observation during the Ob/Gyn clerkship. While the majority of Ob/Gyn clerkship directors were not highly satisfied with either pelvic or breast examination training programs, they were less likely to describe their breast examination training programs as excellent as compared to pelvic examination training-overall suggesting an opportunity for improvement. The survey results will be useful in identifying future challenges in teaching such skills in a cost-effective manner.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 20%
Professor 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 12 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Psychology 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 16 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,504,756
of 14,259,008 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#275
of 2,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,501
of 379,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#34
of 274 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,259,008 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,101 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 379,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 274 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.