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Healthy and productive workers: using intervention mapping to design a workplace health promotion and wellness program to improve presenteeism

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2016
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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49 Dimensions

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453 Mendeley
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Title
Healthy and productive workers: using intervention mapping to design a workplace health promotion and wellness program to improve presenteeism
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3843-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlo Ammendolia, Pierre Côté, Carol Cancelliere, J. David Cassidy, Jan Hartvigsen, Eleanor Boyle, Sophie Soklaridis, Paula Stern, Benjamin Amick

Abstract

Presenteeism is a growing problem in developed countries mostly due to an aging workforce. The economic costs related to presenteeism exceed those of absenteeism and employer health costs. Employers are implementing workplace health promotion and wellness programs to improve health among workers and reduce presenteeism. How best to design, integrate and deliver these programs are unknown. The main purpose of this study was to use an intervention mapping approach to develop a workplace health promotion and wellness program aimed at reducing presenteeism. We partnered with a large international financial services company and used a qualitative synthesis based on an intervention mapping methodology. Evidence from systematic reviews and key articles on reducing presenteeism and implementing health promotion programs was combined with theoretical models for changing behavior and stakeholder experience. This was then systematically operationalized into a program using discussion groups and consensus among experts and stakeholders. The top health problem impacting our workplace partner was mental health. Depression and stress were the first and second highest cause of productivity loss respectively. A multi-pronged program with detailed action steps was developed and directed at key stakeholders and health conditions. For mental health, regular sharing focus groups, social networking, monthly personal stories from leadership using webinars and multi-media communications, expert-led workshops, lunch and learn sessions and manager and employee training were part of a comprehensive program. Comprehensive, specific and multi-pronged strategies were developed and aimed at encouraging healthy behaviours that impact presenteeism such as regular exercise, proper nutrition, adequate sleep, smoking cessation, socialization and work-life balance. Limitations of the intervention mapping process included high resource and time requirements, the lack of external input and viewpoints skewed towards middle and upper management, and using secondary workplace data of unknown validity and reliability. In general, intervention mapping was a useful method to develop a workplace health promotion and wellness program aimed at reducing presenteeism. The methodology provided a step-by-step process to unravel a complex problem. The process compelled participants to think critically, collaboratively and in nontraditional ways.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 453 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 450 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 93 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 13%
Student > Bachelor 54 12%
Researcher 46 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 35 8%
Other 91 20%
Unknown 75 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 77 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 70 15%
Psychology 59 13%
Social Sciences 39 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 33 7%
Other 93 21%
Unknown 82 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,535,139
of 8,690,011 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,724
of 7,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,203
of 274,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#191
of 204 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,690,011 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,177 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 204 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.