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Multidisciplinary management of breast cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Public Health, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
Multidisciplinary management of breast cancer
Published in
Archives of Public Health, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13690-016-0163-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne-France Leclerc, Guy Jerusalem, Martine Devos, Jean-Michel Crielaard, Didier Maquet

Abstract

Breast cancer, with an increasing incidence, is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women worldwide. The treatments proposed, generally a combination of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and/or targeted therapy, are constantly improving, allowing a reduction in the mortality rate, but they are still causing many side effects, not only early but also late, which leads us to consider the post-cancer period as a chronic condition. Side effects, reviewed in this commentary, may affect physical functions, psychological status, social situation, body composition, well-being and quality of life of the patient. In view of the extent of these areas in which side effects of breast cancer and of its treatments can be found, the supportive care offered at the end of treatment need to be multidisciplinary. Different supportive care interventions may be proposed to the patients such as psychological and behavioral interventions, complementary therapies, diet interventions, physical activity/rehabilitation or also physiotherapy interventions for example, all having shown some beneficial effects in the literature. The benefits of these supportive care interventions are thereby already established and they are described in this article, but others studies will be needed to clearly define indications and most optimal modalities of application to reduce side effects and improve quality of life of patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 22%
Student > Bachelor 19 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Other 7 7%
Researcher 6 6%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 23 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 22%
Sports and Recreations 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 27 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,613,734
of 13,525,779 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Public Health
#253
of 380 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,640
of 333,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Public Health
#17
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,525,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 380 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,960 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.