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Neurotensin is increased in serum of young children with autistic disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, August 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Neurotensin is increased in serum of young children with autistic disorder
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, August 2010
DOI 10.1186/1742-2094-7-48
Pubmed ID
Authors

Asimenia Angelidou, Konstantinos Francis, Magdalini Vasiadi, Konstantinos-Dionysios Alysandratos, Bodi Zhang, Athanasios Theoharides, Lefteris Lykouras, Kyriaki Sideri, Dimitrios Kalogeromitros, Theoharis C Theoharides

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of pervasive neurodevelopmental disorders diagnosed in early childhood. They are associated with a set of "core symptoms" that include disabilities in social interaction skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, as well as repetitive and stereotypic behaviors. There is no definite pathogenetic mechanism or diagnostic tests. Many children with ASD also have "allergic-like" symptoms, but test negative implying mast cell activation by non-allergic triggers. We measured by Milliplex arrays serum levels of 3 neuropeptides that could stimulate mast cells in children with autistic disorder (n = 19; 16 males and 3 females; mean age 3.0 ± 0.4 years) and healthy, unrelated controls (n = 16; 13 males and 3 females; mean age 3 ± 1.2 years). Only neurotensin (NT) was significantly increased from 60.5 ± 6.0 pg/ml in controls to 105.6 ± 12.4 pg/ml in autistic disorder (p = 0.004). There was no statistically significant difference in the serum levels of β-endorphin or substance P (SP). NT could stimulate immune cells, especially mast cells, and/or have direct effects on brain inflammation and ASD.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 2%
Unknown 60 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 25%
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Other 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 21%
Neuroscience 6 10%
Psychology 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,564,405
of 18,796,975 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#181
of 2,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,800
of 169,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,796,975 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,229 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 169,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.