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A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of visual hallucinations in the human striate cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioral and Brain Functions, November 2016
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3 tweeters

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22 Mendeley
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Title
A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of visual hallucinations in the human striate cortex
Published in
Behavioral and Brain Functions, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12993-016-0115-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hina Abid, Fayyaz Ahmad, Soo Y. Lee, Hyun W. Park, Dongmi Im, Iftikhar Ahmad, Safee U. Chaudhary

Abstract

Human beings frequently experience fear, phobia, migraine and hallucinations, however, the cerebral mechanisms underpinning these conditions remain poorly understood. Towards this goal, in this work, we aim to correlate the human ocular perceptions with visual hallucinations, and map them to their cerebral origins. An fMRI study was performed to examine the visual cortical areas including the striate, parastriate and peristriate cortex in the occipital lobe of the human brain. 24 healthy subjects were enrolled and four visual patterns including hallucination circle (HCC), hallucination fan (HCF), retinotopy circle (RTC) and retinotopy cross (RTX) were used towards registering their impact in the aforementioned visual related areas. One-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate the significance of difference between induced activations. Multinomial regression and and K-means were used to cluster activation patterns in visual areas of the brain. Significant activations were observed in the visual cortex as a result of stimulus presentation. The responses induced by visual stimuli were resolved to Brodmann areas 17, 18 and 19. Activation data clustered into independent and mutually exclusive clusters with HCC registering higher activations as compared to HCF, RTC and RTX. We conclude that small circular objects, in rotation, tend to leave greater hallucinating impressions in the visual region. The similarity between observed activation patterns and those reported in conditions such as epilepsy and visual hallucinations can help elucidate the cortical mechanisms underlying these conditions. Trial Registration 1121_GWJUNG.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Mathematics 1 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 8 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,799,553
of 12,936,827 outputs
Outputs from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#201
of 360 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,829
of 368,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,936,827 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 360 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 368,373 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.