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African herbal medicines in the treatment of HIV: Hypoxis and Sutherlandia. An overview of evidence and pharmacology

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, May 2005
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 X users
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1 Facebook page
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5 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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178 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
248 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
African herbal medicines in the treatment of HIV: Hypoxis and Sutherlandia. An overview of evidence and pharmacology
Published in
Nutrition Journal, May 2005
DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-4-19
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward Mills, Curtis Cooper, Dugald Seely, Izzy Kanfer

Abstract

In Africa, herbal medicines are often used as primary treatment for HIV/AIDS and for HIV-related problems. In general, traditional medicines are not well researched, and are poorly regulated. We review the evidence and safety concerns related to the use of two specific African herbals, which are currently recommended by the Ministry of Health in South Africa and member states for use in HIV: African Potato and Sutherlandia. We review the pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetics of these herbal medicines. Despite the popularity of their use and the support of Ministries of Health and NGOs in some African countries, no clinical trials of efficacy exist, and low-level evidence of harm identifies the potential for drug interactions with antiretroviral drugs. Efforts should be made by mainstream health professionals to provide validated information to traditional healers and patients on the judicious use of herbal remedies. This may reduce harm through failed expectations, pharmacologic adverse events including possible drug/herb interactions and unnecessary added therapeutic costs. Efforts should also be directed at evaluating the possible benefits of natural products in HIV/AIDS treatment.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 248 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Malawi 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 240 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 49 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 13%
Student > Bachelor 32 13%
Researcher 29 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 4%
Other 48 19%
Unknown 46 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 20 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 6%
Chemistry 12 5%
Other 54 22%
Unknown 53 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2023.
All research outputs
#2,927,457
of 23,577,547 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#616
of 1,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,434
of 57,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,577,547 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,447 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 57,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them