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High rates of multidrug-resistant and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis among re-treatment cases: where do they come from?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
High rates of multidrug-resistant and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis among re-treatment cases: where do they come from?
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2171-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Romain Ragonnet, James M. Trauer, Justin T. Denholm, Ben J. Marais, Emma S. McBryde

Abstract

Globally 3.9% of new and 21% of re-treatment tuberculosis (TB) cases are multidrug-resistant or rifampicin-resistant (MDR/RR), which is often interpreted as evidence that drug resistance results mainly from poor treatment adherence. This study aims to assess the respective contributions of the different causal pathways leading to MDR/RR-TB at re-treatment. We use a simple mathematical model to simulate progression between the different stages of disease and treatment for patients diagnosed with TB. The model is parameterised using region and country-specific TB disease burden data reported by the World Health Organization (WHO). The contributions of four separate causal pathways to MDR/RR-TB among re-treatment cases are estimated: I) initial drug-susceptible TB with resistance amplification during treatment; II) initial MDR/RR-TB inappropriately treated as drug-susceptible TB; III) MDR/RR-TB relapse despite appropriate treatment; and IV) re-infection with MDR/RR-TB. At the global level, Pathways I, II, III and IV contribute 38% (28-49, 95% Simulation Interval), 44% (36-52, 95% SI), 6% (5-7, 95% SI) and 12% (7-19, 95% SI) respectively to the burden of MDR/RR-TB among re-treatment cases. Pathway II is dominant in the Western Pacific (74%; 67-80 95% SI), Eastern Mediterranean (68%; 60-74 95% SI) and European (53%; 48-59 95% SI) regions, while Pathway I makes the greatest contribution in the American (53%; 40-66 95% SI), African (43%; 28-61 95% SI) and South-East Asian (50%; 40-59 95% SI) regions. Globally, failure to diagnose MDR/RR-TB at first presentation is the leading cause of the high proportion of MDR/RR-TB among re-treatment cases. These findings highlight the need for contextualised solutions to limit the impact and spread of MDR/RR-TB.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 78 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 22%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 6 8%
Other 19 24%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 28%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Mathematics 4 5%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 24 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2017.
All research outputs
#837,997
of 9,043,909 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#272
of 3,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,304
of 307,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#16
of 167 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,043,909 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,997 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 167 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.