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De-implementation strategy to Reduce the Inappropriate use of urinary and intravenous CATheters: study protocol for the RICAT-study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
De-implementation strategy to Reduce the Inappropriate use of urinary and intravenous CATheters: study protocol for the RICAT-study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2154-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bart J. Laan, Ingrid J. B. Spijkerman, Mieke H. Godfried, Berend C. Pasmooij, Jolanda M. Maaskant, Marjon J. Borgert, Brent C. Opmeer, Margreet C. Vos, Suzanne E. Geerlings

Abstract

Urinary and (peripheral and central) intravenous catheters are widely used in hospitalized patients. However, up to 56% of the catheters do not have an appropriate indication and some serious complications with the use of these catheters can occur. The main objective of our quality improvement project is to reduce the use of catheters without an appropriate indication by 25-50%, and to evaluate the affecting factors of our de-implementation strategy. In a multicenter, prospective interrupted time series analysis, several interventions to avoid inappropriate use of catheters will be conducted in seven hospitals in the Netherlands. Firstly, we will define a list of appropriate indications for urinary and (peripheral and central) intravenous catheters, which will restrict the use of catheters and urge catheter removal when the indication is no longer appropriate. Secondly, after the baseline measurements, the intervention will take place, which consists of a kick-off meeting, including a competitive feedback report of the baseline measurements, and education of healthcare workers and patients. Additional strategies based on the baseline data and local conditions are optional. The primary endpoint is the percentage of catheters with an inappropriate indication on the day of data collection before and after the de-implementation strategy. Secondary endpoints are catheter-related infections or other complications, catheter re-insertion rate, length of hospital (and ICU) stay and mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of the de-implementation strategy will be calculated. This study aims to reduce the use of urinary and intravenous catheters with an inappropriate indication, and as a result reduce the catheter-related complications. If (cost-) effective it provides a tool for a nationwide approach to reduce catheter-related infections and other complications. Dutch trial registry: NTR6015 . Registered 9 August 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 18%
Researcher 9 13%
Other 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Librarian 5 7%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 17 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 22 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 21%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 21 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,542,594
of 21,740,538 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#772
of 7,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,989
of 422,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#71
of 591 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,740,538 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,403 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 422,151 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 591 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.