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Mass spectrometry for the detection of potential psychiatric biomarkers

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Molecular Psychiatry, June 2013
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Mass spectrometry for the detection of potential psychiatric biomarkers
Published in
Journal of Molecular Psychiatry, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/2049-9256-1-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Armand G Ngounou Wetie, Izabela Sokolowska, Kelly Wormwood, Katherine Beglinger, Tanja Maria Michel, Johannes Thome, Costel C Darie, Alisa G Woods

Abstract

The search for molecules that can act as potential biomarkers is increasing in the scientific community, including in the field of psychiatry. The field of proteomics is evolving and its indispensability for identifying biomarkers is clear. Among proteomic tools, mass spectrometry is the core technique for qualitative and quantitative identification of protein markers. While significant progress has been made in the understanding of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, psychiatric disorders have not been as extensively investigated. Recent and successful applications of mass spectrometry-based proteomics in fields such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, infectious diseases and neurodegenerative disorders suggest a similar path for psychiatric disorders. In this brief review, we describe mass spectrometry and its use in psychiatric biomarker research and highlight some of the possible challenges of undertaking this type of work. Further, specific examples of candidate biomarkers are highlighted. A short comparison of proteomic with genomic methods for biomarker discovery research is presented. In summary, mass spectrometry-based techniques may greatly facilitate ongoing efforts to understand molecular mechanisms of psychiatric disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Chemistry 4 9%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2014.
All research outputs
#13,335,430
of 21,346,872 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Molecular Psychiatry
#24
of 32 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,726
of 175,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Molecular Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,346,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 32 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one scored the same or higher as 8 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them