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Saliva sampling in global clinical studies: the impact of low sampling volume on performance of DNA in downstream genotyping experiments

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, June 2013
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Title
Saliva sampling in global clinical studies: the impact of low sampling volume on performance of DNA in downstream genotyping experiments
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1755-8794-6-20
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J Pulford, Michael Mosteller, J David Briley, Kelley W Johansson, Anita J Nelsen

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The collection of viable DNA samples is an essential element of any genetics research programme. Biological samples for DNA purification are now routinely collected in many studies with a variety of sampling methods available. Initial observation in this study suggested a reduced genotyping success rate of some saliva derived DNA samples when compared to blood derived DNA samples prompting further investigation. METHODS: Genotyping success rate was investigated to assess the suitability of using saliva samples in future safety and efficacy pharmacogenetics experiments. The Oragene(R) OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva from 1468 subjects enrolled in global clinical studies. Statistical analysis evaluated the impact of saliva sample volume of collection on the quality, yield, concentration and performance of saliva DNA in genotyping assays. RESULTS: Across 13 global clinical studies that utilized the Oragene(R) OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit there was variability in the volume of saliva sample collection with ~31% of participants providing 0.5 mL of saliva, rather than the recommended 2 mL. While the majority of saliva DNA samples provided high quality genotype data, collection of 0.5 mL volumes of saliva contributed to DNA samples being significantly less likely to pass genotyping quality control standards. Assessment of DNA sample characteristics that may influence genotyping outcomes indicated that saliva sample volume, DNA purity and turbidity were independently associated with sample genotype pass rate, but that saliva collection volume had the greatest effect. CONCLUSION: When employing saliva sampling to obtain DNA, it is important to encourage all study participants to provide sufficient sample to minimize potential loss of data in downstream genotyping experiments.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 23%
Chemistry 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2013.
All research outputs
#2,898,661
of 3,631,167 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#185
of 235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,615
of 85,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#12
of 15 outputs
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