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The influence of antibiotic prophylaxis on bacterial resistance in urinary tract infections in children with spina bifida

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
The influence of antibiotic prophylaxis on bacterial resistance in urinary tract infections in children with spina bifida
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2166-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sebastiaan Hermanus Johannes Zegers, Jeanne Dieleman, Tjomme van der Bruggen, Jan Kimpen, Catharine de Jong-de Vos van Steenwijk

Abstract

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is an increasingly threatening consequence of antimicrobial exposure for many decades now. In urinary tract infections (UTIs), antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) increases bacterial resistance. We studied the resistance patterns of positive urinary cultures in spina bifida children on clean intermittent catheterization, both continuing and stopping AP. In a cohort of 176 spina bifida patients, 88 continued and 88 stopped using AP. During 18 months, a fortnightly catheterized urine sample for bacterial pathogens was cultured. UTIs and significant bacteriuria (SBU) were defined as a positive culture with a single species of bacteria, respectively with and without clinical symptoms and leukocyturia. We compared the percentage of resistance to commonly used antibiotics in the isolated bacteria in both groups. In a total of 4917 cultures, 713 (14.5%) had a positive monoculture, 54.3% of which were Escherichia coli. In the group stopping AP, the resistance percentage to antibiotics in UTI / SBU bacteria was lower than in the group remaining on AP, even when excluding the administered prophylaxis. Stopping antibiotic prophylaxis for urinary tract infections is associated with reduced bacterial resistance to antibiotics in children with spina bifida. ISRCTN ISRCTN56278131 . Registered 20 December 2005.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 23%
Student > Master 7 9%
Other 7 9%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 20 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 40%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Chemistry 2 2%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 23 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2017.
All research outputs
#3,418,818
of 13,300,844 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,075
of 4,950 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,435
of 371,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#132
of 578 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,300,844 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,950 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,140 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 578 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.