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Social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning: a participatory ethnographic study in Renk, South Sudan

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
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Title
Social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning: a participatory ethnographic study in Renk, South Sudan
Published in
Reproductive Health, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0273-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Khalifa Elmusharaf, Elaine Byrne, Diarmuid O’Donovan

Abstract

Understanding what determines family size is crucial for programmes that aim to provide family planning services during and after conflicts. Recent research found that development agents in post conflict settings do not necessarily take time to understand the context adequately, translate their context understanding into programming, or adjust programming in the light of changes. South Sudan, a country that has been suffering from war for almost 50 years, has one of the highest maternal death rates and the lowest contraceptive utilization rates in the world. This research used Participatory Ethnographic Evaluation and Research (PEER) to provide a contextualised understanding of social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning. Fourteen women were recruited from 14 villages in Renk County in South Sudan in the period 2010-2012. They were trained to design research instruments, conduct interviews, collect narratives and stories and analyse data to identify, prioritize and address their maternal health concerns. As a result of wars, people are under pressure to increase their family sizes and thus increase the nation's population. This is to compensate for the men perished in war and the high child death rates. Large family size is regarded as a national obligation. Women are caught up in a vicious cycle of high fertility and a high rate of child mortality. Determinants of large family size include: 1) Social and cultural practices, 2) Clan lineage and 3) Compensation for loss of family members. Three strategies are used to increase family size: 1) Marry several women, 2) Husbands taking care of women, and 3) Financial stability. Consequences of big families include: 1) Financial burden, 2) Fear of losing children, 3) Borrowing children and 4) Husband shirking responsibility. The desire to have a big family will remain in South Sudan until families realise that their children will live longer, that their men will not be taken by the war, and that the costs of living will be met. In order to generate demand for family planning in South Sudan, priority should be given first to improve infant and child health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 116 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 22%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 32 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 21%
Social Sciences 21 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 33 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,608,325
of 15,919,321 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#301
of 1,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,000
of 356,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,919,321 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,050 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 356,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them