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Surveillance and response for high-risk populations: what can malaria elimination programmes learn from the experience of HIV?

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
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Title
Surveillance and response for high-risk populations: what can malaria elimination programmes learn from the experience of HIV?
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1679-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jerry O. Jacobson, Carmen Cueto, Jennifer L. Smith, Jimee Hwang, Roly Gosling, Adam Bennett

Abstract

To eliminate malaria, malaria programmes need to develop new strategies for surveillance and response appropriate for the changing epidemiology that accompanies transmission decline, in which transmission is increasingly driven by population subgroups whose behaviours place them at increased exposure. Conventional tools of malaria surveillance and response are likely not sufficient in many elimination settings for accessing high-risk population subgroups, such as mobile and migrant populations (MMPs), given their greater likelihood of asymptomatic infections, illegal risk behaviours, limited access to public health facilities, and high mobility including extended periods travelling away from home. More adaptive, targeted strategies are needed to monitor transmission and intervention coverage effectively in these groups. Much can be learned from HIV programmes' experience with "second generation surveillance", including how to rapidly adapt surveillance and response strategies to changing transmission patterns, biological and behavioural surveys that utilize targeted sampling methods for specific behavioural subgroups, and methods for population size estimation. This paper reviews the strategies employed effectively for HIV programmes and offers considerations and recommendations for adapting them to the malaria elimination context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 103 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 26%
Researcher 19 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 4 4%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 21 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 13%
Social Sciences 10 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 25 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,587,797
of 15,797,421 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#705
of 4,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,293
of 357,799 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,797,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,479 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,799 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them