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How acceptable is it for HIV positive African, Caribbean and Black women to provide breast milk/fluid samples for research purposes?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2017
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3 tweeters

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56 Mendeley
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Title
How acceptable is it for HIV positive African, Caribbean and Black women to provide breast milk/fluid samples for research purposes?
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2326-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Kapiriri, W. Tharao, M. Muchenje, I. M. Khatundi, F. Ongoiba

Abstract

The African, Caribbean and Black communities have been found to be reluctant to participate in health research in North America. This is partly attributed to historical experiences as well as their cultural beliefs. Cultural beliefs about the uses of breast milk/fluids could further hinder the participation of African, Caribbean, and Black communities in research involving the collection of breast milk/fluids samples. We conducted 17 in-depth interviews and three group interviews (n = 10) with HIV+ African, Caribbean and Black women living in Ontario, Canada to explore their cultural beliefs about breast milk/fluids and their acceptance of participating in research that involves the provision of breast fluid samples. Qualitative study involving in-depth interviews. Our respondents believed that breast milk/fluids should be used for infant feeding and for curative purposes for a variety of children's health ailments as well as ailments experienced by other family members. The cultural belief that breast milk/fluids could be used to bewitch the baby and mother and the perception that it is intrusive (equating breast milk/fluids research to DNA testing), could prevent African, Caribbean and Black women from participating in research involving the collection of breast milk/fluids. Despite these fears, some respondents expressed that they would participate if the research results would benefit them directly, for example, by finding a cure for HIV, enabling HIV+ mothers to breastfeed, or contributing to developing new drugs or vaccines for HIV. Women's recommendations to facilitate successful recruitment included giving incentives to participants, and employing a recruiter who was trustworthy, informed, and culturally sensitive. Cultural beliefs could present barriers to recruitment and participation of Africa, Caribbean and Black communities in health research involving breast milk/fluid samples. Successful recruitment for future studies would necessitate researchers to be culturally aware of the beliefs held by African, Caribbean and Black women, to build trust, and use an appropriate recruiter. While the findings relate to breast milk/fluids, the suggested recommendations for facilitating recruitment of research participants from these communities may be useful to consider when recruiting ethnically and culturally similar participants for research involving biological samples.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 29%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 5%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 16 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 17 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,045,356
of 14,410,903 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,628
of 3,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,194
of 349,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,410,903 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,255 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,576 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them