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A randomized, blinded, controlled USA field study to assess the use of fluralaner topical solution in controlling canine flea infestations

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, January 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
A randomized, blinded, controlled USA field study to assess the use of fluralaner topical solution in controlling canine flea infestations
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-1971-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheyney Meadows, Frank Guerino, Fangshi Sun

Abstract

Orally administered fluralaner effectively controls fleas and ticks on dogs for 12 weeks. This study evaluates the flea control efficacy achieved with topically applied fluralaner in dogs. This investigator-blinded, multi-center randomized, positive controlled study evaluated flea control efficacy in dogs following a single owner-applied treatment of topical fluralaner. A positive control group received three treatments, at 4-week intervals, of a commercial formulation of fipronil/(S)-methoprene. All dogs in households randomized to the fluralaner group were dispensed an initial treatment at enrollment and a second treatment at week 12 for an additional 3-week observation of treatment safety. Households with up to five healthy dogs, all at least 12 weeks of age and weighing at least 2 kg (4.4 lb), were randomized in a ratio of 3:1 of fluralaner to positive control. Within households, one primary dog with at least 10 live fleas at enrollment was randomly selected. Flea counts were performed on all primary dogs every 4 weeks through week 12. Efficacy measurement was based on reduction from baseline flea counts. Treatment was considered effective if geometric mean live flea count reductions at weeks 4, 8, and 12 were 90% or greater and significantly different from counts at enrollment. In addition, for each time point the arithmetic mean live flea counts, the efficacy based on arithmetic means, the number and percentage of dogs with at least a 90% reduction in flea count, and the number and percentage of flea free dogs were calculated. Statistical comparisons were also made between treatment groups. At 12 sites, across 10 states, 121 households (221 dogs) were randomized to receive fluralaner and 44 households (100 dogs) were randomized to receive the positive control. Fluralaner was demonstrated to be significantly effective (all P ≤ 0.0001) at 4 weeks (99.8% reduction), 8 weeks (99.9%), and 12 weeks (99.9%). The positive control was significantly different from baseline (all P ≤ 0.0001) and showed a reduction of 81.2% at 4 weeks and was effective at 8 weeks (90.3%) and 12 weeks (93.0%). Arithmetic mean flea count reductions for the fluralaner group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks were 99.8, 99.9, and 99.9%, respectively. For the positive control, arithmetic mean flea count reductions were 58.8, 75.3, and 80.8% at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, respectively. No treatment-related serious adverse events were reported in either group. Owner-applied topical fluralaner treatment was safe in dogs and provided ≥ 99.8% flea control efficacy for 12 weeks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Librarian 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 5 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,489,181
of 8,940,530 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,628
of 2,563 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,028
of 307,379 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#57
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,940,530 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,563 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,379 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.