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Genetic markers associated with resistance to beta-lactam and quinolone antimicrobials in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates from humans and animals in central Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
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Title
Genetic markers associated with resistance to beta-lactam and quinolone antimicrobials in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates from humans and animals in central Ethiopia
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13756-017-0171-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tadesse Eguale, Josephine Birungi, Daniel Asrat, Moses N. Njahira, Joyce Njuguna, Wondwossen A. Gebreyes, John S. Gunn, Appolinaire Djikeng, Ephrem Engidawork

Abstract

Beta-lactam and quinolone antimicrobials are commonly used for treatment of infections caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and other pathogens. Resistance to these classes of antimicrobials has increased significantly in the recent years. However, little is known on the genetic basis of resistance to these drugs in Salmonella isolates from Ethiopia. Salmonella isolates with reduced susceptibility to beta-lactams (n = 43) were tested for genes encoding for beta-lactamase enzymes, and those resistant to quinolones (n = 29) for mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) as well as plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes using PCR and sequencing. Beta-lactamase genes (bla) were detected in 34 (79.1%) of the isolates. The dominant bla gene was blaTEM, recovered from 33 (76.7%) of the isolates, majority being TEM-1 (24, 72.7%) followed by TEM-57, (10, 30.3%). The blaOXA-10 and blaCTX-M-15 were detected only in a single S. Concord human isolate. Double substitutions in gyrA (Ser83-Phe + Asp87-Gly) as well as parC (Thr57-Ser + Ser80-Ile) subunits of the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) were detected in all S. Kentucky isolates with high level resistance to both nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Single amino acid substitutions, Ser83-Phe (n = 4) and Ser83-Tyr (n = 1) were also detected in the gyrA gene. An isolate of S. Miami susceptible to nalidixic acid but intermediately resistant to ciprofloxacin had Thr57-Ser and an additional novel mutation (Tyr83-Phe) in the parC gene. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes investigated were not detected in any of the isolates. In some isolates with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and/or nalidixic acid, no mutations in QRDR or PMQR genes were detected. Over half of the quinolone resistant isolates in the current study 17 (58.6%) were also resistant to at least one of the beta-lactam antimicrobials. Acquisition of blaTEM was the principal beta-lactamase resistance mechanism and mutations within QRDR of gyrA and parC were the primary mechanism for resistance to quinolones. Further study on extended spectrum beta-lactamase and quinolone resistance mechanisms in other gram negative pathogens is recommended.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 17%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 19 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 7%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 22 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,526,641
of 8,993,272 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#346
of 388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#204,437
of 309,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#27
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,993,272 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.