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Hospital clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are carried by medical students even before healthcare exposure

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Hospital clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are carried by medical students even before healthcare exposure
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13756-017-0175-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ido Orlin, Assaf Rokney, Avi Onn, Daniel Glikman, Avi Peretz

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are prevalent in healthcare and the community. Few studies have examined MRSA carriage among medical students. The aim of this study is to examine Staphylococcus aureus (SA) carriage, and particular MRSA, over time in cohort medical students. Prospective collection of nasal swabs from medical students in Israel and assessment of SA carriage. Three samples were taken per student in preclinical and clinical parts of studies. Antibiotic susceptibilities were recorded and MRSA typing was performed by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types, Panton Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) encoding genes, and spa types. Clonality was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Among 58 students, SA carriage rates increased from 33% to 38% to 41% at baseline (preclinical studies), 13 and 19 months (clinical studies), respectively (p = 0.07). Methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA) carriage increased in the clinical studies period (22 to 41%, p = 0.01). Overall, seven students (12%) carried 13 MRSA isolates. MRSA isolates were PVL negative and were characterized as SCCmecII-t002, SCCmecIV-t032, or t12435 with untypable SCCmec. MRSA carriage during the pre-clinical studies was evident in 4/7 students. Two students carried different MRSA clones at various times and persistent MRSA carriage was noted in one student. Simultaneous carriage of MRSA and MSSA was not detected. MSSA carriage increased during the clinical part of studies in Israeli medical students. Compared with previous reports, higher rates of MRSA carriage were evident. MRSA strains were genotypically similar to Israeli healthcare-associated clones; however, carriage occurred largely before healthcare exposure, implying community-acquisition of hospital strains.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 33%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Lecturer 4 10%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 8 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2017.
All research outputs
#533,661
of 9,093,370 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#54
of 399 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,981
of 311,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#4
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,093,370 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 399 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,633 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.