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In vitro activity of anti-malarial ozonides against an artemisinin-resistant isolate

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
In vitro activity of anti-malarial ozonides against an artemisinin-resistant isolate
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1696-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabian Baumgärtner, Joëlle Jourdan, Christian Scheurer, Benjamin Blasco, Brice Campo, Pascal Mäser, Sergio Wittlin

Abstract

Recently published data suggest that artemisinin derivatives and synthetic peroxides, such as the ozonides OZ277 and OZ439, have a similar mode of action. Here the cross-resistance of OZ277 and OZ439 and four additional next-generation ozonides was probed against the artemisinin-resistant clinical isolate Plasmodium falciparum Cam3.I, which carries the K13-propeller mutation R539T (Cam3.I(R539T)). The previously described in vitro ring-stage survival assay (RSA0-3h) was employed and a simplified variation of the original protocol was developed. At the pharmacologically relevant concentration of 700 nM, all six ozonides were highly effective against the dihydroartemisinin-resistant P. falciparum Cam3.I(R539T) parasites, showing a per cent survival ranging from <0.01 to 1.83%. A simplified version of the original RSA0-3h method was developed and gave similar results, thus providing a practical drug discovery tool for further optimization of next-generation anti-malarial peroxides. The absence of in vitro cross-resistance against the artemisinin-resistant clinical isolate Cam3.I(R539T) suggests that ozonides could be effective against artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum. How this will translate to the human situation in clinical settings remains to be investigated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 23%
Researcher 13 23%
Student > Master 6 11%
Lecturer 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 14 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2018.
All research outputs
#5,032,236
of 20,867,471 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,265
of 5,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,277
of 388,127 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,867,471 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,279 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,127 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them