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Plasticity of adipose tissue in response to fasting and refeeding in male mice

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2017
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Title
Plasticity of adipose tissue in response to fasting and refeeding in male mice
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12986-016-0159-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hao-Neng Tang, Chen-Yi Tang, Xiao-Fei Man, Shu-Wen Tan, Yue Guo, Jun Tang, Ci-La Zhou, Hou-De Zhou

Abstract

Fasting is the most widely prescribed and self-imposed strategy for treating excessive weight gain and obesity, and has been shown to exert a number of beneficial effects. The aim of the present study was to determine the exact role of fasting and subsequent refeeding on fat distribution in mice. C57/BL6 mice fasted for 24 to 72 h and were then subjected to refeeding for 72 h. At 24, 48 and 72 h of fasting, and 12, 24, 48 and 72 h of refeeding, the mice were sacrificed, and serum and various adipose tissues were collected. Serum biochemical parameters, adipose tissue masses and histomorphological analysis of different depots were detected. MRNA was isolated from various adipose tissues, and the expressions of thermogenesis, visceral signature and lipid metabolism-related genes were examined. The phenotypes of adipose tissues between juvenile and adult mice subjected to fasting and refeeding were also compared. Fasting preferentially consumed mesenteric fat mass and decreased the cell size of mesenteric depots; however, refeeding recovered the mass and morphology of inguinal adipose tissues preferentially compared with visceral depots. Thermogenesis-related gene expression in the inguinal WAT and interscapular BAT were suppressed. Mitochondrial biogenesis was affected by fasting in a depot-specific manner. Furthermore, a short period of fasting led to an increase in visceral signature genes (Wt1, Tcf21) in subcutaneous adipose tissue, while the expression of these genes decreased sharply as the fasting time increased. Additionally, lipogenesis-related markers were enhanced to a greater extent greater in subcutaneous depots compared with those in visceral adipose tissues by refeeding. Although similar phenotypic changes in adipose tissue were observed between juvenile mice and adult mice subjected to fasting and refeeding, the alterations appeared earlier and more sensitively in juvenile mice. Fasting preferentially consumes lipids in visceral adipose tissues, whereas refeeding recovers lipids predominantly in subcutaneous adipose tissues, which indicated the significance of plasticity of adipose organs for fat distribution when subject to food deprivation or refeeding.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2021.
All research outputs
#12,562,026
of 21,322,016 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#529
of 907 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,565
of 391,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,322,016 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 907 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 391,404 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them