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Fructose in perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
46 X users
facebook
10 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
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Title
Fructose in perspective
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, July 2013
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-10-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard D Feinman, Eugene J Fine

Abstract

Whether dietary fructose (as sucrose or high fructose corn syrup) has unique effects separate from its role as carbohydrate, or, in fact, whether it can be considered inherently harmful, even a toxin, has assumed prominence in nutrition. Much of the popular and scientific media have already decided against fructose and calls for regulation and taxation come from many quarters. There are conflicting data, however. Outcomes attributed to fructose - obesity, high triglycerides and other features of metabolic syndrome - are not found in every experimental test and may be more reliably caused by increased total carbohydrate. In this review, we try to put fructose in perspective by looking at the basic metabolic reactions. We conclude that fructose is best understood as part of carbohydrate metabolism. The pathways of fructose and glucose metabolism converge at the level of the triose-phosphates and, therefore, any downstream effects also occur with glucose. In addition, a substantial part of ingested fructose is turned to glucose. Regulation of fructose metabolism per se, is at the level of substrate control - the lower Km of fructokinase compared to glucokinase will affect the population of triose-phosphates. Generally deleterious effects of administering fructose alone suggest that fructose metabolism is normally controlled in part by glucose. Because the mechanisms of fructose effects are largely those of a carbohydrate, one has to ask what the proper control should be for experiments that compare fructose to glucose. In fact, there is a large literature showing benefits in replacing total carbohydrate with other nutrients, usually fat, and such experiments sensibly constitute the proper control for comparisons of the two sugars. In terms of public health, a rush to judgement analogous to the fat-cholesterol-heart story, is likely to have unpredictable outcome and unintended consequences. Popular opinion cannot be ignored in this problem and comparing fructose to ethanol, for example, is without biochemical correlates. Also, nothing in the biochemistry suggests that sugar is a toxin. Dietary carbohydrate restriction remains the best strategy for obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The specific contribution of the removal of fructose or sucrose to this effect remains unknown.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
Australia 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Unknown 269 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 57 20%
Student > Master 36 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 11%
Other 26 9%
Researcher 23 8%
Other 61 22%
Unknown 48 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 69 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 53 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 9%
Chemistry 9 3%
Other 34 12%
Unknown 61 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 61. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2021.
All research outputs
#701,365
of 25,374,647 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#120
of 1,014 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,338
of 206,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#2
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,647 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,014 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 206,711 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.