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Differences in meristem size and expression of branching genes are associated with variation in panicle phenotype in wild and domesticated African rice

Overview of attention for article published in EvoDevo, January 2017
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Title
Differences in meristem size and expression of branching genes are associated with variation in panicle phenotype in wild and domesticated African rice
Published in
EvoDevo, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13227-017-0065-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. N. Ta, H. Adam, Y. M. Staedler, J. Schönenberger, T. Harrop, J. Tregear, N. V. Do, P. Gantet, A. Ghesquière, S. Jouannic

Abstract

The African rice Oryza glaberrima was domesticated from its wild relative Oryza barthii about 3000 years ago. During the domestication process, panicle complexity changed from a panicle with low complexity in O. barthii, to a highly branched panicle carrying more seeds in O. glaberrima. To understand the basis of this differential panicle development between the two species, we conducted morphological and molecular analyses of early panicle development. Using X-ray tomography, we analyzed the morphological basis of early developmental stages of panicle development. We uncovered evidence for a wider rachis meristem in O. glaberrima than in O. barthii. At the molecular level, spatial and temporal expression profiles of orthologs of O. sativa genes related to meristem activity and meristem fate control were obtained using in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR. Despite highly conserved spatial expression patterns between O. glaberrima and O. barthii, differences in the expression levels of these early acting genes were detected. The higher complexity of the O. glaberrima panicle compared to that of its wild relative O. barthii is associated with a wider rachis meristem and a modification of expression of branching-related genes. Our study indicates that the expression of genes in the miR156/miR529/SPL and TAW1 pathways, along with that of their target genes, is altered from the unbranched stage of development. This suggests that differences in panicle complexity between the two African rice species result from early alterations to gene expression during reproductive development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 24%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Professor 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 14%
Energy 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Unknown 11 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,853,276
of 8,993,272 outputs
Outputs from EvoDevo
#172
of 194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,956
of 309,226 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EvoDevo
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,993,272 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 194 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,226 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.