↓ Skip to main content

Variation in human dental pulp stem cell ageing profiles reflect contrasting proliferative and regenerative capabilities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cell Biology, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Variation in human dental pulp stem cell ageing profiles reflect contrasting proliferative and regenerative capabilities
Published in
BMC Cell Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12860-017-0128-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amr Alraies, Nadia Y. A. Alaidaroos, Rachel J. Waddington, Ryan Moseley, Alastair J. Sloan

Abstract

Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are increasingly being recognized as a viable cell source for regenerative medicine. Although significant variations in their ex vivo expansion are well-established, DPSC proliferative heterogeneity remains poorly understood, despite such characteristics influencing their regenerative and therapeutic potential. This study assessed clonal human DPSC regenerative potential and the impact of cellular senescence on these responses, to better understand DPSC functional behaviour. All DPSCs were negative for hTERT. Whilst one DPSC population reached >80 PDs before senescence, other populations only achieved <40 PDs, correlating with DPSCs with high proliferative capacities possessing longer telomeres (18.9 kb) than less proliferative populations (5-13 kb). High proliferative capacity DPSCs exhibited prolonged stem cell marker expression, but lacked CD271. Early-onset senescence, stem cell marker loss and positive CD271 expression in DPSCs with low proliferative capacities were associated with impaired osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, favouring adipogenesis. DPSCs with high proliferative capacities only demonstrated impaired differentiation following prolonged expansion (>60 PDs). This study has identified that proliferative and regenerative heterogeneity is related to contrasting telomere lengths and CD271 expression between DPSC populations. These characteristics may ultimately be used to selectively screen and isolate high proliferative capacity/multi-potent DPSCs for regenerative medicine exploitation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Researcher 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 16%
Unspecified 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,858,328
of 9,000,236 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cell Biology
#148
of 218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,953
of 309,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cell Biology
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,000,236 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 218 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,288 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.