↓ Skip to main content

The ruminal microbiome associated with methane emissions from ruminant livestock

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, January 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 712)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
167 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
409 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The ruminal microbiome associated with methane emissions from ruminant livestock
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40104-017-0141-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ilma Tapio, Timothy J. Snelling, Francesco Strozzi, R. John Wallace

Abstract

Methane emissions from ruminant livestock contribute significantly to the large environmental footprint of agriculture. The rumen is the principal source of methane, and certain features of the microbiome are associated with low/high methane phenotypes. Despite their primary role in methanogenesis, the abundance of archaea has only a weak correlation with methane emissions from individual animals. The composition of the archaeal community appears to have a stronger effect, with animals harbouring the Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii clade tending to be associated with greater methane emissions. Ciliate protozoa produce abundant H2, the main substrate for methanogenesis in the rumen, and their removal (defaunation) results in an average 11% lower methane emissions in vivo, but the results are not consistent. Different protozoal genera seem to result in greater methane emissions, though community types (A, AB, B and O) did not differ. Within the bacteria, three different 'ruminotypes' have been identified, two of which predispose animals to have lower methane emissions. The two low-methane ruminotypes are generally characterized by less abundant H2-producing bacteria. A lower abundance of Proteobacteria and differences in certain Bacteroidetes and anaerobic fungi seem to be associated with high methane emissions. Rumen anaerobic fungi produce abundant H2 and formate, and their abundance generally corresponds to the level of methane emissions. Thus, microbiome analysis is consistent with known pathways for H2 production and methanogenesis, but not yet in a predictive manner. The production and utilisation of formate by the ruminal microbiota is poorly understood and may be a source of variability between animals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 409 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Finland 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 407 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 74 18%
Student > Master 67 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 64 16%
Student > Bachelor 32 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 4%
Other 61 15%
Unknown 93 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 174 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 24 6%
Environmental Science 18 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 3%
Other 32 8%
Unknown 115 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2022.
All research outputs
#1,491,360
of 22,487,039 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#9
of 712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,581
of 397,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,487,039 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 712 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,281 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them