↓ Skip to main content

DNM1 mutation status, sex, and sterilization status of a cohort of Labrador retrievers with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Medicine and Genetics, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
DNM1 mutation status, sex, and sterilization status of a cohort of Labrador retrievers with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture
Published in
Canine Medicine and Genetics, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40575-017-0041-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kari J Ekenstedt, Katie M Minor, Aaron K Rendahl, Michael G Conzemius

Abstract

Exercise-induced collapse (EIC) due to DNM1 mutation and rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament are both common syndromes in the Labrador retriever breed. A cohort of 313 Labradors was recruited based on their CCLR status and were subsequently genetically tested for EIC. Epidemiological aspects of the cohort were also described, including sex, sterilization status, and age at sterilization. No sex difference was observed in dogs susceptible to EIC (homozygous for the mutant genotype) compared to dogs not susceptible to EIC (heterozygotes and dogs homozygous for the normal genotype). No evidence for association was detected between CCLR status and EIC status (p =0.357), although the sample cohort was not of sufficient size to entirely rule out an association. A significant difference (p = 0.031) was observed in the sex distribution of dogs affected with CCLR compared to those without CCLR. An increased number of female CCLR cases were observed compared to the number of female controls; male CCLR cases and controls were approximately the same number. When CCLR status was examined in each sex, no significant differences were observed between those that were sterilized and those that weren't. However, for female dogs that were sterilized, CCLR cases were significantly higher in dogs sterilized at one year of age or younger compared to those sterilized when over the age of one year (p = 0.0021, OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.55-12.72); for males, this finding was suggestive, but not statistically significant (p = 0.0913, OR 3.57, 95% CI 0.809-14.476). CCLR is not associated with a large increase in EIC occurrence. Statistically, these two syndromes cannot be proven to be unrelated; however, concomitant occurrence of CCLR and EIC in Labrador retrievers is rare, despite the high prevalence of both syndromes in this breed. Epidemiological findings suggest that females may be over-represented in CCLR cases and that early sterilization (≤1 year) may increase the risk of Labradors developing CCLR later in life (particularly in females). These results should be considered preliminary and require confirmation in larger populations of Labrador retrievers.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 25%
Other 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Unknown 7 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2017.
All research outputs
#16,052,773
of 25,390,692 outputs
Outputs from Canine Medicine and Genetics
#75
of 92 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,480
of 415,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Medicine and Genetics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,390,692 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 92 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 114.2. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 415,802 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them