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Weight-bearing recommendations after first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis fixation: a biomechanical comparison

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Weight-bearing recommendations after first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis fixation: a biomechanical comparison
Published in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13018-017-0525-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bradley Campbell, Patrick Schimoler, Sudhir Belagaje, M. C. Miller, S. F. Conti

Abstract

This study sought to determine whether several metatarsophalangeal (MTP) fusion techniques require complete immobilization or if some level of weight-bearing could be recommended after surgery. A comparison of synthetic composite to actual bone was included in order to examine the validity of the testing conditions. Four MTP fusion modalities were tested in synthetic composite bone models: unlocked plating, locked plating, crossed lag screws, and an unlocked plate with a single lag screw. Stiffness was calculated and then used to find the two most rigid constructs; the load to failure was recorded. Stiffness and load to failure testing for the two more rigid constructs in paired cadaveric bones were followed. The unlocked plate plus screw and crossed screw constructs were stiffest (p < 0.008). Loads to failure of the unlocked plate plus screw and crossed screws in synthetic bone were 131 and 101 N, respectively and in cadaveric bone were 154 and 94 N, respectively, which are less than the estimated 25% body weight required at the MTP joint. The plate plus screws were statistically more stiff than crossed screws (p = 0.008), but there was no statistical difference between synthetic and cadaveric bone in load to failure (p = 0.296). The plate plus screw offered the greatest stiffness; the failure test showed that no construct could withstand weight-bearing as tolerated; and, synthetic composite models of the MTP joint did not provide the consistent results in stiffness and failure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 16%
Other 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 14 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 41%
Engineering 5 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,636,347
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#269
of 1,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,112
of 385,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,568,640 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,238 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,551 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them