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Risk factors for excessively prolonged meropenem use in the intensive care setting: a case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Risk factors for excessively prolonged meropenem use in the intensive care setting: a case-control study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2229-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juri Katchanov, Benno Kreuels, Florian P. Maurer, Kai Wöstmann, Johannes Jochum, Christina König, Kariem Seoudy, Holger Rohde, Ansgar W. Lohse, Dominic Wichmann, Michael Baehr, Camilla Rothe, Stefan Kluge

Abstract

Inappropriate use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials affects adversely both the individual patient and the general public. The aim of the study was to identify patients at risk for excessively prolonged carbapenem treatment in the ICU as a target for antimicrobial stewardship interventions. Case-control study in a network of 11 ICUs of a university hospital. Patients with uninterrupted meropenem therapy (MT) > 4 weeks were compared to controls. Controls were defined as patients who stayed on the ICU > 4 weeks and received meropenem for ≤ 2 weeks. Associations between case-control status and potential risk factors were determined in a multivariate logistic regression model. Between 1(st) of January 2013 and 31(st) of December 2015, we identified 36 patients with uninterrupted MT > 4 weeks. Patients with prolonged MT were more likely to be surgical patients (72.2% of cases vs. 31.5% of controls; p ≤ 0.001) with peritonitis being the most common infection (n = 16, 44.4%). In the multivariate logistic regression model colonization with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (OR 7.52; 95% CI 1.88-30.14, p = 0.004) and the type of infection (peritonitis vs. pneumonia: OR 16.96, 95% CI 2.95-97.49) were associated with prolonged MT. Surgical patients with peritonitis and patients with known colonization with MDR Gram-negative bacteria are at risk for excessively prolonged carbapenem therapy and represent an important target population for antimicrobial stewardship interventions.

Twitter Demographics

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 3 6%
Lecturer 3 6%
Other 12 25%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 16 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2017.
All research outputs
#13,022,980
of 22,953,506 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,040
of 7,704 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,314
of 420,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#94
of 169 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,953,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,704 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 420,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 169 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.