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A common polymorphic allele of the LH beta-subunit gene is associated with higher exogenous FSH consumption during controlled ovarian stimulation for assisted reproductive technology

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2013
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Title
A common polymorphic allele of the LH beta-subunit gene is associated with higher exogenous FSH consumption during controlled ovarian stimulation for assisted reproductive technology
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-11-51
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlo Alviggi, Kim Pettersson, Salvatore Longobardi, Claus Andersen, Alessandro Conforti, Pasquale De Rosa, Roberto Clarizia, Ida Strina, Antonio Mollo, Giuseppe De Placido, Peter Humaidan

Abstract

BACKGROUND: V-betaLH is a common genetic variant of LH caused by two polymorphic base changes in the beta subunit gene, altering the amino acid sequence (Trp8Arg and Ile15Thr). In a previous-preliminary trial performed in women undergoing IVF, it was demonstrated that carriers of v-betaLH show sub-optimal ovarian response to a standard long GnRH-agonist down -regulation protocol when stimulated with pure recombinant FSH (r-hFSH). The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that women with v-betaLH display hypo-sensitivity to exogenous FSH in a larger IVF population and to explore the frequency of this variant in a Danish female population. METHODS: In the present study, the effect of v-betaLH was retrospectively investigated in a larger series of women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and, for the first time, in a Danish IVF population. A total of 220 normogonadotrophic women following a long GnRH-agonist down-regulation protocol received an individualized dose of r-hFSH (100 IU and 375 IU s.c. daily) according to antral follicle count, baseline FSH, body mass index and age. The LH genotype was assessed in all patients by immunofluorometric assay. RESULTS: V-betaLH was present in 11% of patients, whereas the allelic frequency was 12%. The study population was divided into two groups according to their LH genotype. Group A consisted of 196 wt/wt women. Group B included 24 individuals with v-betaLH (21 heterozygous and 3 homozygous). No statistically significant differences in the mean number of oocytes retrieved, fertilization rate and pregnancy rate per cycle were observed between groups. However, Group B received a significantly higher cumulative-dose of r-hFSH than Group A (2435.86 +/- 932.8 IU versus 1959.8 +/- 736.45 p = 0.048). When one-way ANOVA in a within design was applied, the LH genotype had a statistically significant effect (p < 0.01) on the cumulative dose of r-hFSH, showing a progressive increase from wt/wt (1959.8 +/- 736.45 IU) to v-betaLH hetero- (2267.5 +/- 824.3) and homozygotic women (3558.3 +/- 970.9). CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm that carriers exhibit hypo-sensitivity to exogenous FSH during COS, documenting that the frequency of v-betaLH in Denmark is similar to a number of European countries.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 20%
Other 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Professor 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 9 22%
Unknown 9 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Computer Science 2 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2013.
All research outputs
#9,963,017
of 12,445,189 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#341
of 498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,454
of 121,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,445,189 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 498 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.