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Designing a complex intervention for dementia case management in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Designing a complex intervention for dementia case management in primary care
Published in
BMC Family Practice, July 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-101
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy Waugh, Allana Austin, Jill Manthorpe, Chris Fox, Barbara Stephens, Louise Robinson, Steve Iliffe

Abstract

Community-based support will become increasingly important for people with dementia, but currently services are fragmented and the quality of care is variable. Case management is a popular approach to care co-ordination, but evidence to date on its effectiveness in dementia has been equivocal. Case management interventions need to be designed to overcome obstacles to care co-ordination and maximise benefit. A successful case management methodology was adapted from the United States (US) version for use in English primary care, with a view to a definitive trial. Medical Research Council guidance on the development of complex interventions was implemented in the adaptation process, to capture the skill sets, person characteristics and learning needs of primary care based case managers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 173 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 19%
Student > Master 27 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 34 20%
Unknown 35 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 36 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 20%
Psychology 26 15%
Social Sciences 13 7%
Engineering 7 4%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 46 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2015.
All research outputs
#7,429,612
of 22,714,025 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#855
of 1,854 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,648
of 172,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#18
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,714,025 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,854 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,131 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.