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Walking in fully immersive virtual environments: an evaluation of potential adverse effects in older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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65 Dimensions

Readers on

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345 Mendeley
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Title
Walking in fully immersive virtual environments: an evaluation of potential adverse effects in older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s disease
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12984-017-0225-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aram Kim, Nora Darakjian, James M. Finley

Abstract

Virtual reality (VR) has recently been explored as a tool for neurorehabilitation to enable individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) to practice challenging skills in a safe environment. Current technological advances have enabled the use of affordable, fully immersive head-mounted displays (HMDs) for potential therapeutic applications. However, while previous studies have used HMDs in individuals with PD, these were only used for short bouts of walking. Clinical applications of VR for gait training would likely involve an extended exposure to the virtual environment, which has the potential to cause individuals with PD to experience simulator-related adverse effects due to their age or pathology. Thus, our objective was to evaluate the safety of using an HMD for longer bouts of walking in fully immersive VR for older adults and individuals with PD. Thirty-three participants (11 healthy young, 11 healthy older adults, and 11 individuals with PD) were recruited for this study. Participants walked for 20 min while viewing a virtual city scene through an HMD (Oculus Rift DK2). Safety was evaluated using the mini-BESTest, measures of center of pressure (CoP) excursion, and questionnaires addressing symptoms of simulator sickness (SSQ) and measures of stress and arousal. Most participants successfully completed all trials without any discomfort. There were no significant changes for any of our groups in symptoms of simulator sickness or measures of static and dynamic balance after exposure to the virtual environment. Surprisingly, measures of stress decreased in all groups while the PD group also increased the level of arousal after exposure. Older adults and individuals with PD were able to successfully use immersive VR during walking without adverse effects. This provides systematic evidence supporting the safety of immersive VR for gait training in these populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 345 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 345 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 62 18%
Student > Bachelor 54 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 16%
Researcher 30 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 6%
Other 49 14%
Unknown 74 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 51 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 36 10%
Neuroscience 34 10%
Engineering 34 10%
Psychology 26 8%
Other 75 22%
Unknown 89 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2019.
All research outputs
#4,384,443
of 15,924,228 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#278
of 965 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,202
of 263,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,924,228 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 965 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.