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Small ruminant lentivirus genetic subgroups associate with sheep TMEM154 genotypes

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, July 2013
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2 tweeters

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Title
Small ruminant lentivirus genetic subgroups associate with sheep TMEM154 genotypes
Published in
Veterinary Research, July 2013
DOI 10.1186/1297-9716-44-64
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucia H Sider, Michael P Heaton, Carol G Chitko-McKown, Greg P Harhay, Timothy PL Smith, Kreg A Leymaster, William W Laegreid, Michael L Clawson

Abstract

Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) are prevalent in North American sheep and a major cause of production losses for the U.S. sheep industry. Sheep susceptibility to SRLV infection is influenced by genetic variation within the ovine transmembrane 154 gene (TMEM154). Animals with either of two distinct TMEM154 haplotypes that both encode glutamate at position 35 of the protein (E35) are at greater risk of SRLV infection than those homozygous with a lysine (K35) haplotype. Prior to this study, it was unknown if TMEM154 associations with infection are influenced by SRLV genetic subgroups. Accordingly, our goals were to characterize SRLVs naturally infecting sheep from a diverse U.S. Midwestern flock and test them for associations with TMEM154 E35K genotypes. Two regions of the SRLV genome were targeted for proviral amplification, cloning, sequence analysis, and association testing with TMEM154 E35K genotypes: gag and the transmembrane region of env. Independent analyses of gag and env sequences showed that they clustered in two subgroups (1 and 2), they were distinct from SRLV subtypes originating from Europe, and that subgroup 1 associated with hemizygous and homozygous TMEM154 K35 genotypes and subgroup 2 with hemi- and homozygous E35 genotypes (gag p<0.001, env p=0.01). These results indicate that SRLVs in the U.S. have adapted to infect sheep with specific TMEM154 E35K genotypes. Consequently, both host and SRLV genotypes affect the relative risk of SRLV infection in sheep.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 41%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Lecturer 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 50%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2013.
All research outputs
#2,926,186
of 6,228,985 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#280
of 520 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,554
of 100,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#14
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,228,985 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 520 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 100,274 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.