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Complementary primary mental health programs for young people in Australia: Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) and headspace

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Systems, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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105 Mendeley
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Title
Complementary primary mental health programs for young people in Australia: Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) and headspace
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Systems, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13033-017-0125-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bridget Bassilios, Nicolas Telford, Debra Rickwood, Matthew J. Spittal, Jane Pirkis

Abstract

Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) was introduced in 2001 by the Australian Government to provide evidence-based psychological interventions for people with high prevalence disorders. headspace, Australia's National Youth Mental Health Foundation, was established in 2006 to promote and facilitate improvements in the mental health, social wellbeing and economic participation of young people aged 12-25 years. Both programs provided free or low cost psychological services. This paper aims to describe the uptake of psychological services by people aged 12-25 years via ATAPS and headspace, the characteristics of these clients, the types of services received and preliminary client outcomes achieved. Data from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2012 were sourced from the respective national web-based minimum datasets used for routine data collection in ATAPS and headspace. In total, 20,156 and 17,337 young people accessed two or more psychological services via ATAPS and headspace, respectively, in the 3-year analysis period. There were notable differences between the clients of, and the services delivered by, the programs. ATAPS clients were less likely to be male (31 vs 39%) and to reside in major cities (51 vs 62%) than headspace clients; ATAPS clients were also older (18-21 vs 15-17 years modal age group). There was some variation in the number and types of psychological sessions that young people received via the programs but the majority received at least one session of cognitive behavioural therapy. Based on limited available outcome data, both programs appear to have produced improvements in clients' mental health; specifically, psychological distress as assessed by the Kessler-10 (K-10) was reduced. ATAPS and headspace have delivered free or low-cost psychological services to 12-25 year olds with somewhat different characteristics. Both programs have had promising effects on mental health. ATAPS and headspace have operated in a complementary fashion to fill a service gap for young people.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Researcher 9 9%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 24 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 28 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 11%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 31 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,096,762
of 11,415,522 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#234
of 366 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,443
of 260,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,415,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 366 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,064 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.