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Inhibition of cell proliferation does not slow down echinoderm neural regeneration

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, February 2017
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Title
Inhibition of cell proliferation does not slow down echinoderm neural regeneration
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12983-017-0196-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vladimir S. Mashanov, Olga R. Zueva, José E. García-Arrarás

Abstract

Regeneration of the damaged central nervous system is one of the most interesting post-embryonic developmental phenomena. Two distinct cellular events have been implicated in supplying regenerative neurogenesis with cellular material - generation of new cells through cell proliferation and recruitment of already existing cells through cell migration. The relative contribution and importance of these two mechanisms is often unknown. Here, we use the regenerating radial nerve cord (RNC) of the echinoderm Holothuria glaberrima as a model of extensive post-traumatic neurogenesis in the deuterostome central nervous system. To uncouple the effects of cell proliferation from those of cell migration, we treated regenerating animals with aphidicolin, a specific inhibitor of S-phase DNA replication. To monitor the effect of aphidicolin on DNA synthesis, we used BrdU immunocytochemistry. The specific radial glial marker ERG1 was used to label the regenerating RNC. Cell migration was tracked with vital staining with the lipophilic dye DiI. Aphidicolin treatment resulted in a significant 2.1-fold decrease in cell proliferation. In spite of this, the regenerating RNC in the treated animals did not differ in histological architecture, size and cell number from its counterpart in the control vehicle-treated animals. DiI labeling showed extensive cell migration in the RNC. Some cells migrated from as far as 2 mm away from the injury plane to contribute to the neural outgrowth. We suggest that inhibition of cell division in the regenerating RNC of H. glaberrima is compensated for by recruitment of cells, which migrate into the RNC outgrowth from deeper regions of the neuroepithelium. Neural regeneration in echinoderms is thus a highly regulative developmental phenomenon, in which the size of the cell pool can be controlled either by cell proliferation or cell migration, and the latter can neutralize perturbations in the former.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 20%
Student > Master 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Professor 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 32%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Chemistry 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,615,644
of 13,218,736 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#341
of 486 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,553
of 257,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#13
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,218,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 486 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.3. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,906 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.