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Can tryptophan supplement intake at breakfast enhance melatonin secretion at night?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 254)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters
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1 video uploader

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Can tryptophan supplement intake at breakfast enhance melatonin secretion at night?
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40101-017-0135-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shunsuke Nagashima, Makoto Yamashita, Chiaki Tojo, Masayuki Kondo, Takeshi Morita, Tomoko Wakamura

Abstract

Tryptophan (TRP) is an essential amino acid, and it has been suggested that TRP intake at breakfast combined with daytime bright light exposure can increase nocturnal melatonin secretion. However, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of TRP supplement intake at breakfast on nocturnal melatonin secretion under different daytime light intensities in humans. Twelve subjects (aged 21.3 ± 3.0 years, mean ± standard deviation) participated in a random order in experimental sessions lasting 3 days under four conditions in a laboratory setting. The four conditions were TRP*Bright, Placebo*Bright, TRP*Dim, and Placebo*Dim. A TRP capsule (1000 mg) or a placebo starch capsule (1000 mg) were taken at breakfast. In addition, during the daytime (07:00-18:00), the subjects were asked to stay under different light intensities: >5000 lx (bright) or <50 lx (dim). Saliva samples were collected for measuring the concentration of melatonin. The time courses of melatonin concentration and dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) were compared among the four conditions using repeated measurements analysis of variance (ANOVA). Nocturnal melatonin concentrations in the bright light condition tended to be higher than in the dim light condition (main effect of light: p = .099). Moreover, in the bright light condition, the change in DLMO between baseline and after the intervention was significantly higher than that in the dim light condition (main effect of light: p <.001). However, the ANOVA results indicated no significant effect of TRP intake on melatonin secretion. Our findings indicated that intake of 1000 mg of TRP at breakfast on 1 day did not change nocturnal melatonin secretion, even though TRP is the precursor of melatonin. In contrast, daytime bright light exposure increased nocturnal melatonin secretion and advanced the phase of melatonin onset. Therefore, TRP supplementation, unlike exposure to daytime bright light, does not acutely affect biological rhythm and sleep in humans. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry: UMIN000024121.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 28%
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 16%
Environmental Science 8 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2022.
All research outputs
#2,617,806
of 21,993,335 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#44
of 254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,237
of 277,824 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,993,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 254 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,824 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them