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High-mobility group protein box1 expression correlates with peritumoral macrophage infiltration and unfavorable prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2016
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Title
High-mobility group protein box1 expression correlates with peritumoral macrophage infiltration and unfavorable prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2883-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiang-Bo Zhang, Qing-an Jia, Hong Wang, Chun-Xiao Hu, Dong Sun, Run-De Jiang, Zong-Li Zhang

Abstract

High-mobility group protein box1 (HMGB1) is a pivotal factor in the development and progression of many types of tumor. Its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and especially its correlation with intratumoral and peritumoral macrophage infiltration, remains obscure. We analyzed the potential roles and prognostic value of HMGB1 and explored the correlation between HMGB1 and macrophage infiltration in HCC using clinical samples. We reviewed clinicopathological and follow-up data on a cohort of 149 patients with HCC complicated with Hepatitis B-related cirrhosis. We measured the expression of HMGB1 and CD68 in tumoral and peritumoral liver tissues after curative resection and assessed the impacts of the tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) count and HMGB1 expression on clinicopathologic characteristics, overall survival (OS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Ninety-four of the patients had elevated tumoral HMGB1 expression and 59 of the patients had elevated peritumoral HMGB1 expression, compared to only 4 patients with elevated peritumoral HMGB1 expression in 36 pateints with Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-negative HCC without liver cirrhosis (p < 0.001). The peritumoral HMGB1 expression levels were correlated with tumor invasiveness, BCLC stage, and recurrence. The degree of TAM infiltration was higher in peritumoral tissues with high HMGB1 expression than in peritumoral tissues with low HMGB1 expression (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in TAM infiltration between tumoral tissues with high and low HMGB1 expression. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that intratumoral HMGB1 overexpression was associated with poor OS, but not with RFS. High peritumoral HMGB1expression and TAM count, which correlated positively with tumor size and BCLC stage, were independent prognostic factors for OS (p < 0.001 and p = 0.017, respectively) and RFS (p = 0.002 and p = 0.024, respectively). Multivariate analyses indicated peritumoral HMGB1 expression (p = 0.014) and TAM count (p = 0.037), as well as tumor differentiation (p = 0.026), to be independent significant prognostic factors for RFS. High HMGB1 expression in peritumoral liver tissues correlated with peritumoral macrophage infiltration and had prognostic value in HCC, suggesting that peritumoral HMGB1 might show promise as a new biomarker to predict HCC progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 19%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2017.
All research outputs
#10,497,316
of 11,845,495 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,529
of 4,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,321
of 259,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#52
of 70 outputs
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