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Blood cholesterol in late-life and cognitive decline: a longitudinal study of the Chinese elderly

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, March 2017
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Title
Blood cholesterol in late-life and cognitive decline: a longitudinal study of the Chinese elderly
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13024-017-0167-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chaoran Ma, Zhaoxue Yin, Pengfei Zhu, Jiesi Luo, Xiaoming Shi, Xiang Gao

Abstract

Previous studies regarding the lipid-cognition relation in older adults are limited and have generated mixed results. We thus examined whether higher blood cholesterol concentrations were associated with faster cognitive decline in a community-based longitudinal study of Chinese elderly. The study included 1,159 Chinese adults aged over 60 years (women: 48.7%, mean age: 79.4 years), who were free of dementia, Parkinson disease and stroke at the baseline. Blood concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG), were assessed at the baseline. Global cognitive functions were assessed using the Chinese Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at in 2009, 2012 and 2014. Association between blood cholesterol and repeated cognitive function was analyzed with linear mixed models, adjusting for sociodemographic information, behavior and lifestyle, depression symptoms, physical examination, hypertension, and laboratory indexes. Higher baseline TC and LDL-C concentrations were significantly associated with greater cognitive decline. Adjusted mean difference in cognitive decline rate, comparing two extreme quartiles, was 0.28 points (MMSE score) per year (95% confident interval (CI): -0.54,-0.02; P-trend = 0.005) for TC and 0.42 points per year (95% CI: -0.69, -0.16; P-trend = 0.006) for LDL-C. In a subgroup analysis, the associations between all lipids and cognitive decline appeared to be more pronounced among individuals aged 100 years or older (n = 90), relative to others. Higher blood concentrations of TC and LDL-C in late-life were associated with faster global cognitive decline.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 131 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 15%
Student > Master 16 12%
Researcher 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 42 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 15%
Psychology 15 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 8%
Neuroscience 9 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 4%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 49 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,986,657
of 9,165,968 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#386
of 448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,834
of 253,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#16
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,165,968 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 448 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.