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PIG3 promotes NSCLC cell mitotic progression and is associated with poor prognosis of NSCLC patients

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, March 2017
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Title
PIG3 promotes NSCLC cell mitotic progression and is associated with poor prognosis of NSCLC patients
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13046-017-0508-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ming Li, Shanhu Li, Biao Liu, Meng-Meng Gu, Shitao Zou, Bei-Bei Xiao, Lan Yu, Wei-Qun Ding, Ping-Kun Zhou, Jundong Zhou, Zeng-Fu Shang

Abstract

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. In this study we explored the potential role of p53-induced gene 3 (PIG3) in the progression of NSCLC. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression levels of PIG3 in 201 NSCLC patients. We performed in vitro studies and silenced endogenous PIG3 by using specific siRNAs that specific target PIG3. Immunofluorescent staining was performed to determine the effect of PIG3 on mitotic progression in NSCLC cells. The growth rates of microtubules were determined by microtubule nucleation analysis. Cell proliferation and chemosensitivity were analyzed by CCK8 assays. Annexin V staining and β-galactosidase activity analysis were used to evaluate PIG3 deficiency-related apoptosis and senescence, respectively. PIG3 expression levels negatively correlated with overall survival and disease-free survival of NSCLC patients. Knock down of PIG3 resulted in repressed proliferation of NSCLC cells and increased aberrant mitosis, which included misaligning and lagging chromosomes, and bi- or multi-nucleated giant cells. In addition, PIG3 contributed to mitotic spindle assembly by promoting microtubule growth. Furthermore, loss of PIG3 sensitized NSCLC cells to docetaxel by enhancing docetaxel-induced apoptosis and senescence. Our results indicate that PIG3 promotes NSCLC progression and therefore suggest that PIG3 may be a potential prognostic biomarker and novel therapeutic target for the treatment of NSCLC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 27%
Student > Master 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 40%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 13%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Neuroscience 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,000,258
of 9,183,818 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#262
of 510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,790
of 253,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,183,818 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 510 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,917 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.