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Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, September 2013
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards
Published in
Veterinary Research, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1297-9716-44-84
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anke C Stöhr, Silvia Blahak, Kim O Heckers, Jutta Wiechert, Helge Behncke, Karina Mathes, Pascale Günther, Peer Zwart, Inna Ball, Birgit Rüschoff, Rachel E Marschang

Abstract

Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 3 7%
Researcher 2 4%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 43%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2022.
All research outputs
#13,151,950
of 22,310,710 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#587
of 1,183 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,562
of 185,941 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,310,710 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,183 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 185,941 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.