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Sociodemographic and delivery risk factors for developing postpartum depression in a sample of 3233 mothers from the Czech ELSPAC study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, March 2017
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Title
Sociodemographic and delivery risk factors for developing postpartum depression in a sample of 3233 mothers from the Czech ELSPAC study
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1261-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam Fiala, Jan Švancara, Jana Klánová, Tomáš Kašpárek

Abstract

In the postpartum period, certain groups of women are at a higher risk for developing depressive episodes. Several studies have described risk factors for developing postpartum depression (PPD). However, these studies have used limited numbers of participants, and therefore the estimated prevalence of PPD varies greatly. The objective of this study is to identify the main risk factors for developing PPD by using data collected via the Czech version of the European Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ELSPAC). This database provides a representative sample (n = 7589) observed prospectively and a large amount of data on depressive symptoms and on biological, socioeconomic, and environmental factors. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was used to screen for incidence of PPD. The affective pathology was examined at three time points: before delivery, 6 weeks after delivery, and 6 months after delivery. The prevalence of depressive symptoms before delivery was 12.8%, 6 weeks after delivery 11.8%, and 6 months after delivery 10.1%. The prevalence rates are based on women who completed questionnaires at all three time-points (N = 3233). At all three time points, the main risk factors for developing PPD identified as significant by both univariate and multivariate analysis were personal history of depressive episodes and mothers experiencing psychosocial stressors. Other risk factors occurring in both types of analysis were: family history of depression from expectant mother's paternal side (prenatal), mothers living without partners (6 weeks postpartum) and feelings of unhappiness about being pregnant (6 months postpartum). Several protective factors were also observed: male child gender (prenatal), primiparous mothers (6 months postpartum), and secondary education (prenatal, only by multivariate analysis). Significant risk factors found solely by univariate analysis were family history of depression in both parents of the expectant mother (prenatal and 6 weeks postpartum), family history of depression from subject's maternal side (6 months postpartum), unintentional pregnancy (prenatal and 6 weeks postpartum), feelings of unhappiness about being pregnant (prenatal and 6 weeks postpartum), primary education (prenatal and 6 weeks postpartum), mothers who opted not to breastfeed (6 months postpartum) and mothers living without partners (prenatal and 6 months postpartum). Family savings were identified as protective factor (prenatal and 6 months postpartum). We identified significant predictors of PPD. These predictors can be easily detected in clinical practice, and systematic screening can lead to identifying potentially at risk mothers. Since the risk is linked with experience of psychosocial stressors it seems that they might benefit from increased psychosocial support to prevent affective pathology.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 247 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 247 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 13%
Student > Master 28 11%
Student > Postgraduate 22 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 6%
Other 32 13%
Unknown 101 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 33 13%
Psychology 26 11%
Social Sciences 7 3%
Neuroscience 5 2%
Other 27 11%
Unknown 105 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2017.
All research outputs
#16,985,033
of 19,200,799 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,536
of 4,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#240,362
of 278,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
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