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microRNA and thyroid hormone signaling in cardiac and skeletal muscle

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Bioscience, March 2017
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
microRNA and thyroid hormone signaling in cardiac and skeletal muscle
Published in
Cell & Bioscience, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13578-017-0141-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duo Zhang, Yan Li, Shengnan Liu, Yu-cheng Wang, Feifan Guo, Qiwei Zhai, Jingjing Jiang, Hao Ying

Abstract

Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling plays critical roles in the differentiation, growth, metabolism, and physiological function of all organs or tissues, including heart and skeletal muscle. Due to the significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie TH action, it's widely accepted that TH signaling is regulated at multiple levels. A growing number of discoveries suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) act as fine-tune regulators of gene expression and adds sophisticated regulatory tiers to signaling pathways. Recently, some pioneering studies in cardiac and skeletal muscle demonstrating the interplay between miRNAs and TH signaling suggest that miRNAs might mediate and/or modulate TH signaling. This review presents recent advances involving the crosstalk between miRNAs and TH signaling and current evidence showing the importance of miRNA in TH signaling with particular emphasis on the study of muscle-specific miRNAs (myomiRs) in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Although the research of the reciprocal regulation of miRNAs and TH signaling is only at the beginning stage, it has already contributed to our current understanding of both TH action and miRNA biology. We also encourage further investigations to address the relative contributions of miRNAs in TH signaling under physiological and pathological conditions and how a group of miRNAs are coordinated to integrate into the complex hierarchical regulatory network of TH.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Lecturer 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2017.
All research outputs
#5,058,339
of 9,278,926 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Bioscience
#86
of 211 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,665
of 260,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Bioscience
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,278,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 211 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.