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Congenital Diaphragmatic hernia – a review

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 X users
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1 Facebook page
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3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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182 Dimensions

Readers on

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401 Mendeley
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Title
Congenital Diaphragmatic hernia – a review
Published in
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40748-017-0045-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Praveen Kumar Chandrasekharan, Munmun Rawat, Rajeshwari Madappa, David H. Rothstein, Satyan Lakshminrusimha

Abstract

Congenital Diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a condition characterized by a defect in the diaphragm leading to protrusion of abdominal contents into the thoracic cavity interfering with normal development of the lungs. The defect may range from a small aperture in the posterior muscle rim to complete absence of diaphragm. The pathophysiology of CDH is a combination of lung hypoplasia and immaturity associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn (PPHN) and cardiac dysfunction. Prenatal assessment of lung to head ratio (LHR) and position of the liver by ultrasound are used to diagnose and predict outcomes. Delivery of infants with CDH is recommended close to term gestation. Immediate management at birth includes bowel decompression, avoidance of mask ventilation and endotracheal tube placement if required. The main focus of management includes gentle ventilation, hemodynamic monitoring and treatment of pulmonary hypertension followed by surgery. Although inhaled nitric oxide is not approved by FDA for the treatment of PPHN induced by CDH, it is commonly used. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is typically considered after failure of conventional medical management for infants ≥ 34 weeks' gestation or with weight >2 kg with CDH and no associated major lethal anomalies. Multiple factors such as prematurity, associated abnormalities, severity of PPHN, type of repair and need for ECMO can affect the survival of an infant with CDH. With advances in the management of CDH, the overall survival has improved and has been reported to be 70-90% in non-ECMO infants and up to 50% in infants who undergo ECMO.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 401 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 401 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 64 16%
Student > Postgraduate 35 9%
Student > Master 33 8%
Other 32 8%
Researcher 28 7%
Other 68 17%
Unknown 141 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 169 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 2%
Engineering 7 2%
Other 24 6%
Unknown 160 40%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2023.
All research outputs
#5,088,469
of 24,862,067 outputs
Outputs from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#31
of 94 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,266
of 313,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,862,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 94 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,571 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.