↓ Skip to main content

Listening in on difficult conversations: an observational, multi-center investigation of real-time conversations in medical oncology

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2013
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Listening in on difficult conversations: an observational, multi-center investigation of real-time conversations in medical oncology
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-13-455
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brittany C Kimball, Katherine M James, Kathleen J Yost, Cara A Fernandez, Ashok Kumbamu, Aaron L Leppin, Marguerite E Robinson, Gail Geller, Debra L Roter, Susan M Larson, Heinz-Josef Lenz, Agustin A Garcia, Clarence H Braddock, Aminah Jatoi, María Luisa Zúñiga de Nuncio, Victor M Montori, Barbara A Koenig, Jon C Tilburt

Abstract

The quality of communication in medical care has been shown to influence health outcomes. Cancer patients, a highly diverse population, communicate with their clinical care team in diverse ways over the course of their care trajectory. Whether that communication happens and how effective it is may relate to a variety of factors including the type of cancer and the patient's position on the cancer care continuum. Yet, many of the routine needs of cancer patients after initial cancer treatment are often not addressed adequately. Our goal is to identify areas of strength and areas for improvement in cancer communication by investigating real-time cancer consultations in a cross section of patient-clinician interactions at diverse study sites.Methods/designIn this paper we describe the rationale and approach for an ongoing observational study involving three institutions that will utilize quantitative and qualitative methods and employ a short-term longitudinal, prospective follow-up component to investigate decision-making, key topics, and clinician-patient-companion communication dynamics in clinical oncology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Other 5 10%
Unspecified 4 8%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 20%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Unspecified 4 8%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2013.
All research outputs
#9,905,836
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,022
of 4,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,597
of 162,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,558 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 162,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.