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Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) colonization as a risk factor for developing ESBL infections in pediatric cardiac surgery patients: “retrospective cohort study”

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2017
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Title
Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) colonization as a risk factor for developing ESBL infections in pediatric cardiac surgery patients: “retrospective cohort study”
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2346-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amine Cheikh, Bouchra Belefquih, Younes Chajai, Younes Cheikhaoui, Amine El Hassani, Amina Benouda

Abstract

Children with cardiac defects need many hospitalizations and repetitive antibiotic therapies, with an increasing risk of colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB) such as extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) Post-operative infections with these bacteria in paediatric cardiac surgery are life threatening. This article aims to study the prevalence of ESBL colonization among paediatric cardiac surgery patients, and to compare occurrence of post-operative infections with and without ESBL colonization. We also aim to study the correlation between the onset of postoperative infection and other parameters such as age, length of stay and preoperative antibiotic therapy. A retrospective cohort study included paediatric cardiac surgery patients in Cheikh Zaid hospital in Rabat, Morocco, between the 1st of January 2011 and 31 December 2014. A screening for ESBL colonization was requested for children who had a risk factor (previous hospitalization and/or taking antibiotics) at admission. Swabs were collected from three sites (throat, nose and anus). Two groups were compared - patients colonized and not colonized with ESBLs. Statistical analysis was performed using R software. ESBL colonization screening was performed in 111 patients. Positive colonization was detected in 17 cases (15%). Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP): 9 (53%) was the most frequently isolated species. Among the 17 patients, 23.5% (4/17) developed a postoperative infection due to ESBLs versus only one patient without colonization (1%). There was a statically significant difference in terms of occurrence of postoperative infection between the two groups (p = 0.001). Relative risk of developing a postoperative infection with positive colonization was 22 (95% CI, 8.37-58.5). The analysis of colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria and the prevention of nosocomial infections appear to be important challenges for paediatric cardiac surgery. Systematic screening of ESBL colonization for cardiac surgery could have a significant contribution, on one hand to guide prophylactic antibiotic therapy of patients, and on the other, to prevent spread of those infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Postgraduate 10 11%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Unspecified 6 7%
Other 23 26%
Unknown 17 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 49%
Unspecified 7 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2017.
All research outputs
#15,452,475
of 22,962,258 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,513
of 7,707 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,929
of 308,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#115
of 171 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,962,258 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,707 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 171 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.