↓ Skip to main content

Individual karyotypes at the origins of cervical carcinomas

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cytogenetics, October 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 398)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Individual karyotypes at the origins of cervical carcinomas
Published in
Molecular Cytogenetics, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/1755-8166-6-44
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda McCormack, Jiang Lan Fan, Max Duesberg, Mathew Bloomfield, Christian Fiala, Peter Duesberg

Abstract

In 1952 Papanicolaou et al. first diagnosed and graded cervical carcinomas based on individual "abnormal DNA contents" and cellular phenotypes. Surprisingly current papilloma virus and mutation theories of carcinomas do not mention these individualities. The viral theory holds that randomly integrated, defective genomes of papilloma viruses, which are often untranscribed, cause cervical carcinomas with unknown cofactors 20-50 years after infection. Virus-free carcinomas are attributed to mutations of a few tumor-suppressor genes, especially the p53 gene. But the paradox of how a few mutations or latent defective viral DNAs would generate carcinomas with endless individual DNA contents, degrees of malignancies and cellular phenotypes is unsolved. Since speciation predicts individuality, we test here the theory that cancers are autonomous species with individual clonal karyotypes and phenotypes. This theory postulates that carcinogens induce aneuploidy. By unbalancing mitosis genes aneuploidy catalyzes chain reactions of karyotypic evolutions. Most such evolutions end with non-viable karyotypes but a few become new cancer karyotypes. Despite congenitally unbalanced mitosis genes cancer karyotypes are stabilized by clonal selections for cancer-specific autonomy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 29%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 1 4%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Psychology 2 7%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2022.
All research outputs
#807,315
of 22,518,353 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cytogenetics
#3
of 398 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,055
of 209,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cytogenetics
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,518,353 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 398 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.